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About the Lab

2001-2011: Early works

The activities related with the processing of biosignal at the Computational Sciences department began in August 2001 with an MSc thesis on "Extracción y Análisis de Características Acústicas del Llanto de Bebeacute;s para su Reconocimiento Automático Basado en Redes Neuronales" (Automatic extraction and analysis of acoustic features from infant cry using neural networks) by the student José Orozco García. Later, this research on infant cry for diagnostic purposes was continued in the department resulting in some other thesis related with speech recognition and synthesized voice generation. In 2010, new research in the department included works on emotion recognition from voice, and the first steps were taken into brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) to detect unspoken words from EEG records. The increasing number and diversity of applications related to biosignal processing and analysis demanded the creation of a laboratory that could concentrate resources, group the researchers working in these topics and integral supportfor thesis, projects and research in general that was already taking place in the department.

2011: Creation

In October 2011, the creation of the new laboratory was formally put forth and since at that time one of the strong researchlines in the department was that of perception the new laboratory was branded Biosignal and Perception Laboratory. The formal aim of the laboratory was initially stated as:

"The laboratory is planned to reinforce the research line of perception, providing support for all works and experiments related with research projects in the fields of biosignal processing and classification, and with the artificial implementation of senses related to human perception including that of smell and olfactory applications. Among the biosignals already under research, and planned to be further developed, are those of analysis of EEG recordings, and speech and infant cry analysis which also has perceptual components. It is intended to venture in olfactive perception once an artificial nose becomes available. This nose has already been requested by means of an institutional project already approved by CONACYT. Potentially, and given the nature of the laboratory we might be in position to consider further research in electromyograms, electrocardiograms, biometrics, etc. including researchers from the field of computer vision with research interest not necessarily aligned with these initially stated here."

As funding members, the following people were considered:

  • Faculty
    • Dr. Carlos Alberto Reyes García (Head)
    • Dr. Luis Villaseñor Pineda
  • Students
    • Alejandro A. Torres García
    • Humberto Perez Espinosa
    • Alejandro Rosales

2011-2014: First stage

Following the creation of the laboratory, several related active research areas in the department were identified. These were related to applications of computer science in medicine that were also considered to require support from the laboratory. This demanded a review of the laboratory purpose. The name was updated to the current Biosignal Processing and Medical Computing Laboratory. The lab aim was restated as follows:

"The Biosignal Processing and Medical Computing Laboratory is planned to reinforce the research line of perception, providing support for all works and experiments related with research projects in the fields of biosignal processing and classification, and with the artificial implementation of senses related to human perception including that of smell and olfactory applications, as well as medical applications using digital images. Among the biosignals already under research, and planned to be further developed, are those of analysis of EEG recordings, and speech and infant cry analysis which also has perceptual components. It is intended to venture in olfactive perception once an artificial nose becomes available. This nose has already been requested by means of an institutional project already approved by CONACYT. Potentially, and given the nature of the laboratory we might be in position to consider further research in electromyograms, electrocardiograms, biometrics, etc. including researchers from the field of computer vision with research interest not necessarily aligned with these initially stated here."

During this period, the company EmoSpeech servicing on recognition of emotion from voice was established becoming the first spin-off from INAOE.

During this period, the equipment available at the lab was:

  • For the acquisition of EEG recordings, we had an EMOTIV kit. This kit was wireless and had 14 high-resolution channels plus the references CMS/DRL and P3/P4 with a sampling rate of 128Hz.
  • For the processing of speech and infant cry processing, two Intel Pentium 4 computers at 2.4 GHz, with 512 Mb RAM, and 80 Gb hard drives, equipped with capacity for multimedia and a sound card SoundBlaster PCI for the recording and digitization of sound samples.
  • Two servers with AMD K6.2 processors at 1.2 GHz, with 64 Mb RAM and 32 Gb hard drives.
  • A laptop with Pentium 4 processor, 256 Mb RAM and 32 Gb hard drive.
  • Also, we had 3 digital recorders SONY ICD-67.
  • Multifunctional printer Kodak 5300 AiO

Also a 32 channel EEG recording device and an artifical nose were already acquired.

Two other researchers; doctors González Bernal and Sucar Succar, joined the lab. The people at the time were:

  • Faculty
    • Dr. Carlos Alberto Reyes García (Responsable)
    • Dr. Luis Villaseñor Pineda
    • Dr. Jesús Antonio González Bernal
    • Dr. Luis Enrique Sucar Succar
  • Students
    • Alejandro A. Torres García
    • Humberto Perez Espinosa
    • Alejandro Rosales

2014- current: Second stage

From 2014 the research lines were revised further attracting some other researchers of the department. In 2015, the lab equipment was strengthenedwith the incorporation of the neuroimage team who were developing analytical models of brain signals for several neuroimage modalities with special emphasis on electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Applications included brain-computer interfaces, surgical neuroergonomics and neurorehabilitation. With the revision of the research lines, during the period 2014-2016 the Biosignal Processing and Medical Computing Lab became the laboratory currently with the largest growth at the Department of Computational Sciences, both in the number of faculty as well as students. During this period, the lab website was created to give more visibility to the research carried out in the lab.




Open Science Framework

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